Religion & Politics: USF Fall 2006

Tuesday, November 28, 2006

Religion Causes Questioning Over Candidacy

The United States of America. A country that was founded on the principles of freedom of religion, freedom of speech, freedom of assembly, and yet in the politically driven world of today candidates are questioned on the basis of their religion as the deciding factor of whether or not they would make a good “next president.” After I read the article regarding whether or not it was a good idea for a member of the Mormon church’s elite to run for president (see full article http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1562941,00.html) I could not help myself but to think why does it matter if he is a prominent member of the LSD church?
In my opinion politics has gotten to superficially based. Candidates are chosen or ruled out because they don’t look presidential, or they don’t talk like a Senator should. How is there any qualification for how the leader of the United States of America should look? Or how someone who is helping to create and pass the laws of our nation, how is it that their beliefs in God become the main focus of their campaign whether they want it to or not. After the most recent elections there were many stories in the newspaper and online in regards to Ellison, being elected to Congress as a Muslim. Though it is understandable, in the sense that obviously if a person is devoutly spiritual in their specific religion and they do believe everything the church says that’s a different story. But the majority of candidates running today are not a strict as a Franciscan Monk.
When John F. Kennedy was elected president the country threw up its arms and declared to be at a loss, for everyone believed that if JFK was president the pope would end up running America, simply because Kennedy was the first ever catholic president. Clearly it was not the pope that launched the Bay of Pigs invasion, that was Kennedy. As a strong political member Kennedy made decisions based on what he believed would most benefit the country, and ideally that is what our Congress and President do everyday. A person may not always agree with the policies being made or decisions had by the president, but that person got elected because of what they stood for, what they want to do for our country, not because on Sunday’s they don a suit and tie and sit in the third row of Grace Cathedral.
I believe that a Mormon could become president, if he is the candidate the people want. Like any candidate he will need to have a solid background in politics and support issues the common man believes in. This isn’t to say he will be our next president, but it is always a possibility.

1 Comments:

  • You many several good points in that a candidate for such an important position as president should have qualifications and solid background to do the job. If you have president that does not know what he is doing, he is bring down the country as a whole.

    By Blogger anthony, at 12:00 AM  

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